DAS is pleased to be publishing a research report on barriers to employment for disabled people, including a number of recommendations on how best to reduce the disability employment gap. The report includes: an introduction and summary of recommendations; analysis of DAS surveys with disabled people and employers; review of the policy context and other relevant research; policy calls and next steps; and a few case studies. The report is available in a number of other formats, so please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like to access these.

You can download the report here and also some related infographics here.

There are one million disabled people in Scotland. Statistics and other research have shown that disabled people experience lower rates of employment and lower pay than non-disabled people. Some disabled people are not able to work but for other people, being in work, where possible, can have economic and social benefits for individuals, the people around them and beyond. And many disabled people wish to work. Disabled people being in work, where possible, can have economic and social benefits for individuals, the people around them and beyond. But there are more barriers to entering the labour market – not just physical, developmental or related to their mental health, but also in terms of societal and employer attitudes.

It is estimated there are 284,300 disabled workers (aged 16 or over) in Scotland. Of these, 201,900 are employed in the private sector (11% of all private sector employees) and 78,700 are employed in the public sector (11.7% of all public sector employees). However, despite the employment rate improving and the advent of the Equality Act, there is still a significant difference in the number of disabled people in employment (42%) compared to the overall figure (73.4%). Employment rates have actually fallen in recent years among some disabled groups. Five of the six members of DAS provide support to disabled people looking to get into employment. All six members believe employment is a critical issue. It is key that sufficient support is being provided to disabled people to enter, and stay, in the workforce.

BSL for this article:

Action on Hearing Loss logo Capability Scotland logo Enable Scotland logo RNIB Scotland logo SAMH logo Sense Scotland logo